Mt. Elbrus, Russia

10:55:00 PM Brooke Neal 0 Comments

Guest Post by my husband, the mountain climber. 

Mount Elbrus is the tallest mountain in Europe and one of the world's Seven Summits. 5,642 meters (18,510 feet) tall, it's the tallest mountain I've ever climbed. It is is a  dormant volcano located in the western Caucasus mountain range, in Kabardino-Balkaria and Karachay–Cherkessia, Russia, near the border of Georgia Access is not too bad: Munich to Moscow (3 hours) and then Moscow to Mineralnye Vody (2 hours). 

My itinerary was as follows:
July 28: Arrive in Cheget, Russia
29 July: Climb Cheget Peak (2,900 meters)
30 July: Climb Terskol Peak (3,100 meters)
31 July: Climb to Diesel Hut on Mt. Elbrus (4,100 meters)
1 August: Climb to  Pastukhov Rocks (4,700 meters)
2 August: Rest day
3 August: Summit day, awake at 3 am and climb to summit, then descend
4 August: Return to Cheget
5 August: Fly home

The cost of the trip was pretty reasonable. All land costs, including guides, food, lift tickets, transfers and accommodations was 690 Euro. Using miles for my flight I spent just over 1,000 euros, all in. I spent that much climbing Rainier, so LenAlp tours was a killer deal and I love killer deals, as long as I didn't get killed in the process. 

Here are some of my photos and videos from the event. 
Small town where we spent a few nights at front and back end of climb, called Cheget. It has seen better days, littered with half-constructed and abandoned buildings, but still has a few hotels, a bunch of cafes, and gift stands.
All the cafes in Cheget served the same type of food, primarily meat on spits like this -- lamb and chicken.
Big mountains in the background, in the foreground is a woman packing and stacking wood to feed the BBQ at the cafe. As I was in a Muslim part of Russia, the men were all sitting around drinking while the women were doing most of the work.

A totem outside of Terskol. Looked almost like a totem that you would see among the tribes in the Pacific Northwest.

Hiking Terskol Peak

At top of Terskol Peak; apparently they have free-range guard dogs protecting the decrepit buildings and observatory atop this peak.


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